International Day for the Abolition of Slavery

International Day for the Abolition of Slavery

On December 2nd each year, we take the time to recognize International Day for the Abolition of Slavery and contemplate its relevance in the world today. On this significant day in 1949, the United Nations General Assembly acknowledged the gravity of their responsibility to combat the exploitation of prostitution and human trafficking and consequently adopted the Convention for the Suppression of the Traffic in Persons and the Exploitation of the Prostitution of Others. Today, we are dedicated to eradicating the horrific practices of modern slavery, including sexual assault, human trafficking, the most extreme cases of child labor, forced marriage, and the exploitation of minors in armed conflict. Acknowledging the necessity of unified efforts to combat the unfairness of modern slavery is of utmost importance. It is essential that we use this day to unequivocally denounce the despicable practice of modern slavery that continues to exist in the world. The mission of International Day for the Abolition of Slavery is unique from that of International Day for the Remembrance of the Slave Trade and its Abolition, which is intended to be a day of contemplation of the devastating history of the Transatlantic Slave Trade.

 

HISTORY OF INTERNATIONAL DAY FOR THE ABOLITION OF SLAVERY:

In 1926, the League of Nations adopted a resolution calling for the abolition of slavery and the slave trade. In 1949, the United Nations General Assembly adopted a resolution calling for the abolition of slavery, and in 1966, the UN General Assembly passed a resolution officially proclaiming December 2 as International Day for the Abolition of Slavery.

 

Since its inception, International Day for the Abolition of Slavery has been commemorated by various events and activities aimed at raising awareness of the issue of slavery and its abolition. In 2007, the UN General Assembly adopted a resolution calling for a dedicated day to raise public awareness about modern slavery and human trafficking. December 2 was chosen as the official day for this purpose due to its historical significance as the date on which the 1966 UN General Assembly resolution proclaiming December 2 as International Day for the Abolition of Slavery was adopted.

 

The history of International Day for the Abolition of Slavery dates back to the early days of the abolitionist movement. In 1794, French abolitionist Victor Schoelcher published a pamphlet entitled "1801, or the Abolition of Slavery" which called for an end to slavery in the French colonies. In 1804, Haiti became the first country in the world to abolish slavery.

 

Which country first abolished slavery?

In 1833, Britain took the bold and revolutionary step of abolishing slavery in all of its colonies, prompting France to abolish the practice in 1848, and the United States to do the same in 1865.

 

How to spend the International Day for the Abolition of Slavery:

There are various ways to spend International Day for the Abolition of Slavery. Research slavery & its modern forms. You could also make a donation to a charity that helps survivors of slavery. Finally, you could share information about slavery and abolition day on social media to help raise awareness. International Day for the Abolition of Slavery, but one of the best is by learning more about what you can do to help end slavery. You can also find ways to get involved in abolitionist work in your local community. Advocacy and raising awareness is key to ending slavery. You can speak up about the issue, share resources with others, and raise money to support anti-slavery organizations. Finally, you can remember the victims of slavery by commemorating their stories and celebrating their lives.

 

  • Promise to only purchase goods and services from businesses that actively strive to be socially responsible in their operations. Make sure that employees receive a reasonable wage, and that their workplaces are safe and hygienic. Thoroughly investigate the working conditions of suppliers and take swift corrective action if any unethical labor practices are uncovered.

 

  • Making a commitment to ethically sourcing labor is an important step in supporting the people who work hard to make businesses successful. You could encourage other business owners to join you in providing ethical working conditions for employees and use this to promote your products and services to potential customers.

 

  • Examine your own behavior and consider how you may be contributing to the oppression of others. If you recognize that you have acted in a manner that is not in line with your desired behavior, there is still time to make a positive shift and move forward with more conscientious decisions. Having learned about the plight of those who were enslaved, it is essential to gain an appreciation for how oppressive conditions can impact an individual's life. Through such an understanding, we can acknowledge the importance of not becoming the oppressor.

 

Here are five things to know about the slave trade and the abolition of slavery:

  • This alarming figure translates to 4 out of every 100 people being subject to the inhumane practice of modern-day slavery. While this issue is far from being resolved, it is essential to raise the consciousness of this matter so we can work together to bring an end to it.

 

  • According to the International Labour Organization, approximately 21 million people are victims of forced labor, generating approximately $150 billion in illicit earnings for private entities annually.

 

  • Roughly 25% of those subjected to modern slavery are minors.

 

  • Historically, records suggest that the Transatlantic Slave Trade, which took place between the 16th and 19th centuries, involved the transportation of approximately 12 million African people as slaves to the Americas.

 

  • The vast majority of African people taken from their homes during the Transatlantic Slave Trade were sent to Caribbean islands or Brazil in South America.

 

The importance of International Day for the Abolition of Slavery:

  • The International Day for the Abolition of Slavery is a chance to create real and lasting change. Through spreading awareness and encouraging people to take action, we can combat the unjust and inhumane practice of modern slavery.

 

  • Celebrating International Day for the Abolition of Slavery serves as a reminder of our collective failure to create a world without slavery and the suffering that it has caused. It should inspire us to demand something better, so that the mistreatment of individuals and their lack of human rights no longer exists. By commemorating the day, we are recognizing the progress that has been made, as slavery has been abolished.

 

  • On International Day for the Abolition of Slavery, we are reminded to devote ourselves to the service of those who have been unjustly forced into some kind of servitude. This day serves as a reminder of our shared humanity and the gratitude we should have for our freedom, which many of our ancestors did not have. As we reflect on this day and the struggles of those who experienced slavery in the past, we will be more appreciative of the freedom we have today.
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